e a m harris

Roaming the byways of literature

Spark and Carousel – Goodreads Giveaway Now Running!

E A M Harris:

A great offer for anyone interested in fantasy reading, (you’ll probably have to go to the original to use the widget mentioned).

Originally posted on Joanne Hall:

You can get your hands on a FREE paperback of Spark and Carousel in a special Goodreads Giveaway that runs from now until September 26th, to celebrate the release. Enter using the widget below and don’t forget to add the book to you To-Read shelf!

Goodreads Book Giveaway

Spark and Carousel by Joanne Hall

Spark and Carousel

by Joanne Hall

Giveaway ends September 26, 2015.

See the giveaway details
at Goodreads.

Enter Giveaway

Don’t forget that you can also pre-order Spark and Carousel on your local Amazon, in both Kindle version and paperback. Alternatively, come along the physical launch at BristolCon, where there will be cake…

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Haiku, monks and pharaohs

As usual Chèvrefeuille has set an interesting poetic challenge on Carpe Diem. It’s well worth reading the article about Lake Tana and its rich spiritual history.

Some of the poems inspired by this challenge are truly lovely.

I’ve followed in my fellow poets’ footprints with a tanka:

The Blue Nile flowing
from Tana, once heard the songs
of monks and pharaohs.
Now the cloisters are ruins;
the songs but faded legends.

 

A first book from Belinda Broughton

E A M Harris:

An upcoming book that promises to be both exciting and heartwarming.

Originally posted on Belinda Broughton:

Belinda Broughton: Sparrow, Poems of a Refugee Belinda Broughton: Sparrow, Poems of a Refugee

It will launch at 3.00 p.m., Saturday 5th September 2015, at The Light Gallery, Centre for Creative Photography, 138 Richmond Rd, Marleston SA 5033, Australia.

Feel free to pop over, all ye other-side-of-the-worlders!

Will post buying details soon. It will be available from Ginninderra Press, (you have to scroll down to my name) but it doesn’t stay in one’s cart yet; perhaps the link broke. Try again tomorrow.

Here is the blurb from the back cover. What a succinct piece of writing!

sparrow-Kate's-blurb

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Slipped down the plughole?

Lost Pubs cover artI recently came across a book (now, sadly, out of print but still available here and there including libraries) called The Lost Pubs of Bath by Andrew Swift and Kirsten Elliott.

My inner pedant was irritated at the imprecision of the title – how do you lose a pub? Did it slip down the back of the sofa or get thrown out with the old newspapers? Maybe it ran off like a lost puppy.

In reality it may have been demolished or bombed, but in a place like Bath, which seriously conserves its heritage, it has more likely just changed its use. So why not say so in the title?

But ‘lost’ is an emotive word. It carries a lot of baggage for almost anyone – we’ve all lost things or people that mattered to us.

‘Lost’ gives us a straightforward ‘no longer around’ with that little hint of sadness that the vanished past ought to have – though whether any of us would really want to un-vanish it is another question.

So the title is a suitable one, and the inner pedant can go back to sleep.

Kinokophone, libraries of sound and new words

visualized sound

Visualisation of an elephant rumble. (Wikimedia. Authors Stoeger A, Heilmann G, Zeppelzauer M, Ganswindt A, Hensman S, Charlton B)

I came across the name Kinokophone by chance. It is a company dedicated to gathering sounds and using them artistically. They are supported by bodies like the Arts Council, and do some work with the British Library.

Apparently, they invented their name and the word kinokophonography – one of the great new words, a sort of slamming together of Japanese and Greek that rolls off the tongue (after some practice).

All over the world there are libraries of sounds and they’re working hard to preserve and save the various sound recordings – many of which are becoming unplayable. This is an important legacy to hand on to the future.

It’s sad that we can’t hear Shakespeare recite his own poems, but it’s unavoidable. We would have to hang our heads in shame if the same fate overtook today’s poets who are mostly well recorded.

Whispers I Silently Heard

E A M Harris:

A new poetry book. Congratulations to Kimberly, a book represents a lot of hard work.

Originally posted on silentlyheardonce:

On August 14, 2015 my new book of poetry “Whispers I Silently Heard”  will be available everywhere!!!!!

whisper8315

Whispers I Silently Heard is a large collection of my poetry dating back to the nineteen seventies.  I am very proud of the work I put into creating this collection.

You can purchase an autograph copy by simply emailing me at mizsilentlyheard@gmail.com to request a copy and I will send you and invoice.

Whispers I Silently Heard will be available on Kindle, Nook and other eBooks

The paperback will be available at Create a space and you will be able to go to your local bookstore and ask them to order you a copy.

You can pre-order your Kindle copy here

As always I thank you for your support.

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Visiting bees

A summery challenge from Carpe Diem this time, inspired by blogger Laura Williams.

My garden is full of bees at present, so I give them a little mention.

Afternoon: baked still
by sun. Even the quaking grass
is motionless. But
the lavender bush shivers,
jostled by tiger-striped bees.

 

Frank O’Connor award

I’ve just come across the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award, which I’ve never heard of 9781907773716before. The winner this year has recently been announced and it’s Carys Davies with her collection The Redemption of Galen Pike.

I’ve heard of Frank O’Connor and it’s great that he’s remembered by a major award, but as with all these awards, I wonder about the people who didn’t win or even get shortlisted. Does it affect their sales? Does anyone outside their circle even know? How do they feel about it? The prize, at €25,000, is the largest in the world for short stories so winning makes a real difference.

This award is one where a publisher submits a book published within the year concerned. I assume that the author’s permission is needed, but I can imagine conflicts arising if they don’t give it (maybe there’s a prizewinning short story in there somewhere; or a mystery à la MarpleMurder in the Publisher’s Office).

There seems to be quite a revival of short stories lately and prizes like this can only encourage it. The media reports and other publicity must be good for the form and for literature generally, as well as for the writers concerned. So congratulations to Ms Davies, her publisher, Salt, and all the judges and others involved.

Five Fascinating Facts about William Faulkner

E A M Harris:

I love odd facts about famous writers, and these facts are truly odd. My thanks to Interesting Literature for gathering them up and posting them.

Originally posted on Interesting Literature:

Fun facts about the life of William Faulkner, author of The Sound and the Fury

1. William Faulkner was born Falkner; according to one story, the ‘u’ was the result of a typesetting error Faulkner didn’t bother to correct. Curiously, Falkner’s  great-grandfather had been Colonel Faulkner but had removed the ‘u’ – William put it back. Faulkner (William, that is) was born in New Albany in Mississippi in 1897, the eldest of four sons.

2. The website Snopes.com took its name from the Snopes, an unpleasant family who feature in the works of William Faulkner. Faulkner’s Snopes Trilogy, comprising The HamletThe Town, and The Mansion, was published between 1940 and 1959 and centres on the Snopes family, a grasping and corrupt dynasty including a paedophile (Wesley), a pornographer, and a thief (this article has more Snopish detail). Perhaps because of the association between Faulkner’s…

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Holmes and Watson revealed

Holmes and Watson cover artI enjoyed this book. It is well written and scholarly without being pedantic or heavy.

However, I did find it odd reading a biography of people who don’t exist. For instance, as many biographers do, Ms Thomson speculates on what her characters were doing in the times not covered by the published stories. For real people this attempt to fill in gaps makes sense – they must have been doing something. But for fictional characters the true answer is ‘nothing’, and most of the time their creator probably didn’t give the question any thought.

Reading this book has made me want to know more of the real facts and I hope to find a good biography of Conan Doyle in the nearish future.

I recommend this to anyone who enjoys the Holmes stories and who likes a stylish, fictional biography. If you haven’t read any of the stories you’ll miss out on a good deal of the references and nuances, so I suggest you get a few of them in before starting Ms Thomson’s work.

Cover art from goodreads.

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