e a m harris

Roaming the byways of literature

Archive for the category “Blog challenges and sharing”

Mountains haiku

Once again an inspiring post on Carpe Diem. Basho is the model this time.

Today ideas came to me quickly, though, as usual, they needed time to work into the haiku form.

The mountain path
travels down as well as up.
You must follow both.

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A haiku challenge about bonfires.

As usual Carpe Diem has given us an interesting challenge. The post containing it deals with the burning of ornaments at a fire festival. This is about leaving the old and taking on the new.

Fire is the medium for getting rid of whatever is holding you back. I think many religions, particularly Pagan ones, have a fire festival with this theme.

My haiku for this challenge is:

The New Year bonfire;
its white smoke rises skywards.
The flames warm my hands.

Juxtaposition – a new haiku challenge

Carpe Diem has started a series on haiku writing techniques. The first one is on ‘juxtaposition’. Reading the explanation, I realise that I’ve done this often in the past without naming it.

Having a name for something makes it easier to detect and to use properly, so I’m very grateful to Chèvrefeuille for his tutorial and the name.

The following is a haiku I wrote last year.

Soft rain, cloud-barred sun,
rainbow spanning the sky. Below,
the sandcastle crumbles.

A new Carpe Diem challenge.

In a recent post the Carpe Diem site introduced a new-to-me poet, Tomas Tranströmer. We are given a Tranströmer haiku as an inspiration. The season word is ‘frigid’ which makes it definitely winter.

I’m not sure how close I’ve come to the model. but mine is winter too.

Willow trees lean over
the moonlit river, where ice
glitters like starlight.

Another haiku challenge from Carpe Diem

Kite bird flying

This time the challenge is to write a haiku about kites. Apparently kiting is a worldwide phenomenon and popular with all kinds of people of all ages.

But not all kites are man made.

As usual the Carpe Diem site has links to a number of superb haiku. Mine needs illustrating.

kite boxKite meets kite; ignore
each other. Bird and box have
their own agendas.

 

 

Bird from Wikimedia commons Brahminy kite at Nalbana Bird Sanctuary, Odisha India

Kite from Wikimedia commons file sechseckdrachen01 taken by Frank Swichtenberg

 

A new haiku challenge – ‘The rays of the setting sun’.

Once again the Carpe Diem site has come up with an interesting prompt. Its inspiration is a classic haiku by Kikaku, a contemporary of Basho.

This is a translation of the poem:

in the rays of the setting sun
there flutters along the city street
a butterfly

I think it is a lovely image. Mine however leaves the butterflies and concentrates on the sky:

Red-rimmed clouds gather
in the west. Behind them,
today’s sun sets.

As I roamed around the house and garden mulling the haiku and trying different versions in my head, I felt it should be expanded into a tanka.

Red-rimmed clouds gather
in the west. Behind, today’s
sun sets. My neighbour
passes me in the street.
‘Nice day tomorrow,’ he says.

Poems for a perfumed world

Carpe Diem has an interesting article on using all our senses to describe the world and not just sight and sound. How often are we treesconscious of the smell of a scene? Do we reach out and touch something to find out its texture? I love to touch the petals of flowers and their leaves – the variety of texture in the natural world is amazing.

Out of this comes a challenge to write about smell, and I’ve tried to do it justice.

The van, driven past
the wood’s edge, stirs up scents
of damp earth and rich green.

Reading the poems already posted suggests that most people concentrate on the perfume side of this sense, as I’ve done. One day, maybe, I’ll write about the stink of sewage – would that be in the spirit of haiku?

Sunflowers and the sun

Carpe Diem has set us a lovely challenge this time. The prompt is ‘sunflowers’ – very evocative and open to many interpretations.

Fields of sunflowers;
each tracks the sun, east to west.
Nightfall will stop them.

A different haiku challenge

The Carpe Diem site has several different challenges. The one I’m trying today is to complete a haiku given the middle line.

The given line is:

mists over the foreign highlands

Extra restrictions are that it must follow the classical form and use one more kigo (season word) for Autumn. ‘Mist’ is a classic Autumn word.

I looked up some kigo words and found them inspirational.

Now it is twilight;
mists over the foreign highlands
hide the harvest moon.

Although we only have to produce two lines, this challenge isn’t easy, but on the Carpe Diem site are links to a number of amazing poems it has inspired.

Haiku challenge on ‘Shallow Water’

Today Carpe Diem has given us a double challenge. To use the prompt ‘shallow water’ and to relate to an Australian legend of the Dreamtime.

The Carpe Diem website has the full legend of Mirragan, the Fisherman, and Gurangatch, the creature he fished for. Well worth a read for an exciting tale and an insight into another culture.

Here is my attempt at this prompt:

Night! The shallow stream
is black. Only the star-eyes
of Gurangatch shine.

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